Category Archives: car loans

Frugal Fridays: My 3 Year Financial Goals

frugalfridays

I’m now officially in my late 20s. Oh the horror! I will turn the ripe old age of 30 on March 8, 2017. My goal is also to return to graduate school for my PhD by Fall 2017. For the next 3-4 years I have some big goals that I hope to achieve with a lot of hard work and hopefully a bit of luck.

A large majority of my goals are related to financial stability and freedom. Hence why I created this blog; I want to convey my journey in personal finance, as well as travel and life. Through this blog I am very candid about my personal finances. Personal finances have always been a taboo topic in modern American culture, and I believe that money needs to be discussed more openly.

According to the NerdWallet, as of March 2014, the average American household debt is:

  • Average credit card debt: $15,252
  • Average mortgage debt: $152,209
  • Average student loan debt: $32,986

Those statistics are scary figures and I personally believe that a part of it has to do with poor personal finance education and discipline. I believe that the more open people are about their money and personal finance, the more others are aware of it and the more educated they become about money.

I grew up with a pretty good understanding of money. My father really enjoys lecturing me about personal finance, investing, and really anything else. Personally, I think he just likes to hear himself talk half the time. I have a BA in biochemistry from a small state university and a MPH in public health from a private university. I graduated with a total of $44,103 of student loans (not including interest over time).

I’m pretty good with money and tend to save more than I spend. The past few years I have been competing in the sport of triathlon, which I absolutely adore and it is a major part of my lifestyle. The sport of triathlon is not cheap. The further I got into the sport, the more I wanted a better and more expensive bike and to compete in bigger and more expensive races. I ended up spending way more than I probably should have on equipment and expenses related to triathlon (I never went in debt because of these purchases). I don’t regret my purchases, but I had wished that I focused a bit more on paying off student loans etc.

Now that I achieved one of my main goals – to become an Ironman (you can read more about my triathlon life on www.bigskymultisportcoaching.com), I have decided to refocus more on my career and financial goals.

I keep my goals in my personal finance spreadsheet that I created to keep track of everything from my monthly budget, bills, student loans, vacation budgets, etc. I’ve decided to make my goals public to allow others to hold me accountable for my goals and also to show other 20-somethings that educating yourself and making personal finance a priority at a young age will only pay off in the future (I mean that both literally and figuratively).

2014:
  • Purchase new car
  • Save $1500 in my emergency fund
  • Pay off my private student loan (Balance ~ $1500) – PAID
  • Pay off one of my SallieMae loans (current balance ~ $745; target date: 9/14)
  • Rollover my 401k from my old job to a Roth IRA and save cash for the tax payment in 2015
  • Contribute the maximum percent of my salary to receive a company match in my 403b
  • Save my Belize vacation in May and also for my Africa volunteer vacation in November 2015
  • Continue to pay the minimum on all my student loans (estimated 2014 payments: $5100)
2015:
  • Save an additional $2000 in my emergency fund (Target end of 2015 total: $3500)
  • Pay off a second SallieMae loan (current balance ~$745; target date: 1/15)
  • Use the snowball method and pay extra on another SallieMae loan
  • Continue to pay the minimum on all my student loans (estimated 2015 payments: $5100)
  • Continue to save for my Africa volunteer vacation in November 2015 (estimated costs: $4000)
  • Pay off half of my car loan (4/1/14 loan amount: $13.104.20; End 2015 Goal: $6000)
  • Contribute the maximum percent of my salary to receive a company match in my 403b
  • Contribute monthly to my Roth IRA account
2016:
  • Save an additional $3100 in my emergency fund (Target end of 2016 total: $6600)
  • Pay off SallieMae loans using the snowball method (estimated remaining balance: $4300)
  • Continue to pay the minimum on all my student loans (estimated 2016 payments: $5100)
  • Contribute the maximum percent of my salary to receive a company match in my 403b
  • Contribute monthly to my Roth IRA account (ideally max out yearly contribution)
  • Pay for Lasik eye surgery
  • Start saving for future purchase needs (i.e. PhD studies, house, etc.)

My 2016 goals get a bit fuzzy because it’s hard to predict where I’ll be in 3 years. My primary career goal is to work abroad a year through a public health fellowship or possibly teach English abroad before heading back for my PhD in 2017. Ultimately I would like a position that pays a decent living wage while overseas so I can stock pile money and continue to pay off my student loans, but I’m not sure what might happen in the job front.

As you can see, my major themes involve paying off student loan debt (you can read more about my plan to payoff $20,000 of student loans in 3 years HERE) and to contribute to my retirement accounts.

Note: I have also created a unique page above in the menu for this post so I continuously check in and make sure I’m on my path to financial freedom! 🙂

March Budget Check

My March budget is full of red! So much for sticking to the budget I worked so hard to create in January…

I was way over budget due to this kind of large purchase….

The new whip!
The new whip!

It was a sad day when my old car died last week. I knew the day from coming, but was hoping that it would occur closer to December. My father was generous and gave me money for the down-payment, but I now have a $13,104.20 car loan with a monthly payment of $232 starting in April. However, before I even took the car off the lot and to finalize the car loan through my credit union I had to buy car insurance. My 6-month payment was $588. And, of course, it will probably cost me another $500 in April to register it and pay the excise tax. Woof! I’ll be using the save I have saved thus far as a car down-payment to pay for the registration and taxes.

I also went way over my normal food budget as well because of my birthday. I went out for lunch and drinks with some friends, which I normally don’t do very often. I also spent $44 on the night I test drove my car to bribe my father to come to the dealership with me to negotiate the price of the car. Although he really do anything. I spent way more at coffee shops too. Bad, bad!

Eeek Lots of red!
Eeek Lots of red!

I went over my student loan payments, which I consider to be a good thing because I’ve paid off more debt. During the month of March I paid off a $368 grad school loan that was just annoying me plus my normal monthly payments.

Let’s see. I had a lot of extra predicted spending in March, like my dog’s $200 vet bill for her annual exam. I picked up a couple of new shirts at Old Navy on my birthday. They were on sale! Yay! Plus, I had some small business fees as well.

March expenses by categories
March expenses by categories

I think the highlight of my March personal finances was rolling over my old 401k account to a new Roth IRA account with Vanguard and making some $$! I’ve finally been making money with my 403b account with Nationwide as well. I love watching my retirement accounts make money! Let’s hope that pattern continues for the next 40+ years. 🙂

Total Debt as of 4/3/14: $50,121.13 (thank you car loan!) <- includes this month’s credit card bill as well (I pay everything using my CC to earn airline miles)

Total Student Loan Debt as of 4/1/14: $32,842.63 (Goal: Bring total loan debt under $30,000 by end of 2014)

Emergency Fund as of 4/3/14: $850.68 (Goal: $1500 by end of 2014)

Total Savings + Investments as of 4/3/14: $12,866.13

Net Worth as of 4/3/14: $21,255.00 (does not include the value of my new car)

The Time My Car Died and I Had to Buy a New One…

I’ve mentioned several times in my previous blog posts that my big purchase this year was going to be a new car. I purchased a 2000 Hyundai Elantra during the summer of 2006. I worked two jobs the entire summer (without a semblance of a life) to pay for the car. I think I paid about $5000 for the car.

As you can imagine, the older a car gets, the more repairs and money you have to put into them. The past three years have yielded expensive repairs, i.e. a new timing belt, a new clutch, a new alternator, etc. In January I put $400 into my car to get her to past inspection and to hopefully last till December, which was my target purchase date.

Saying goodbye... and taking my plates off
Saying goodbye… and taking my plates off

Well, my poor little car couldn’t make it till December. Last Monday night she died on my way home from work. I was within 3 miles from my house when I stopped at a stop sign before making a righthand turn towards home. My poor little car decided that the stop sign would be her final resting stop. She actually wouldn’t start the friday night before in our driveway, but succeed to start the next morning. I knew something was up, but I was hoping that it was just a fluke.

I called AAA for a tow truck and a nice man pushed my car around the corner so I wasn’t blocking the intersection. Talk about embarrassing! Our trusted family mechanic looked at my car and thought it was the fuel pump. It could have been fixed for about $250, but at this point in my car’s life, I feel like I’m throwing dollar bills down the drain. I decided my money is best spent on purchasing a new car.

I did a lot of research online. I was between the Hyundai Elantra, Ford Focus, Toyota Corolla, and VW Jetta. My budget was about $15,000 (and I was secretly hoping that I could purchase a car plus pay all the tax and fees with the $15,000). I was leaning towards a new car because I couldn’t find too many low mileage used cars. Most used cards I found were priced about the same as a new car.

I checked one of the local car dealer’s website on Thursday morning and found a web special for a left-over 2013 Hyundai Elantra. It was a standard hatchback model. I was hoping to purchase another standard because they tend to be a bit cheaper and not many people want a standard and thus I could probably get a better deal than an automatic. I test drove the car Thursday night. I drove home picked up my Father and had him test drive it as well. We drove back to the dealer and talked pricing with the sales lady. I wasn’t pleased with the presented price and left giving them my bottom line. She said she had to talk to her manager and would call me in the morning.

I got a call at 9am on Friday when the dealership was open. She was willing to bring the price down to my budget. I told her I wanted the offer in writing and would call her back later once she faxed the offer to me. I called my Father to discuss the offer and he suggested that I fill out the car loan application at the credit union and get an insurance quote. I did both and then accepted the offer.

This morning I went back to the dealer with my loan check and my down payment check. The whole process of buying a car is stressful. I’ve been sick with a cold all week and adding on the job of buying a new car has left me feeling still like crap. But, I learned a few lessons about buying a car and hopefully I won’t be using them anytime soon! The dealership tried to quote the price of the car to me in monthly payments. Sure, I could afford their offer, but I wanted to know the true cost of the car! Watch out for this. If you extend a car loan to 72 months then of course your monthly payments will be smaller!

Also, make sure you get everything in writing. I would also suggest getting insurance quotes before purchase as well. You don’t want any expensive surprises later on when you realize that the fancy car you just purchased is going to cost a lot more than the more reliable and plain car.

I lucked out and got a good price on my new car. I probably could have negotiated another $500 off the price, but I just wanted the process to be over. I had a few things working in my favor as well. The car was a 2013 leftover. It was standard. It was the end of March, which means the end of a month, the end of a quarter, and then end of the fiscal year for most car manufacturers and dealers! I couldn’t quite get them to agree to everything including tax and fees under $15,000, but I’m happy with my total price.

The final goodbye (and time to buy a new Ironman sticker)
The final goodbye (and time to buy a new Ironman sticker)

My mechanic has offered to fix and sell my old for me with a cut of the sale. Totally fine by me! I’ll be lucky to get a couple hundred bucks, but it’s better than nothing! I was a bit sad to say my final goodbye to my old friend. We had a good almost 8 years and 100,000+ miles. I think I got my moneys worth from that car. Now, onto better and more adult-like things, like a monthly car payment….